two girls conducting an experiment with green light

For Ages 5 and Up

How 3D glasses work

The only thing that makes going to the movies better is watching your favorite movie in 3D! But how does wearing glasses make movie characters pop out of the screen? And why don’t all glasses do this? This experiment will help you understand how polarization makes this all possible.

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Homemade Kaleidoscope

Have you ever wondered how a mirror shows your reflection? Or how when you look at an angle, you can see objects that aren’t directly in front of the mirror? This activity will help you understand both.

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Nail Polish Rainbow

Rainbows can be seen in many places besides the sky. Maybe you’ve seen them in your sprinklers or reflected off of oil. This experiment explains why that is.

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Rainbow Snowflake

This activity help kids understand diffraction and learn where rainbows come from.

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Swedish Fishing

When you go swimming and look at objects in the pool, you might notice that they appear to be a different size than they really are. You may even notice that objects that are halfway in the water appear to be bent. This fun experiment shows you why this works.

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Homemade Magnifying Glass

Wanna see things up close? This activity helps kids make their very own magnifying glass!

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Indoor Rainbow

Make your very own rainbow with a few household items!

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Why Are Bubbles So Colorful?

In this activity we'll examine this strange phenomenon and how we can experience it throughout nature. We'll also examine what thin slits do to light and how this phenomenon is similar to that of bubbles and oil slicks.

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Black is Black — Or is it?

This activity explores capillary action - how water moves up paper - and chromatography - how different elements of the ink are carried along at different rates, allowing you to see that black ink is actually made up of many different colors.

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Make a Green Gumball Black

A red object appears red because it reflects mostly red light back to your eyes. All the other colors of visible light are absorbed into the object. But what can make a green gumball black?

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